Quiz 3

Just the one! - Contraception

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 Condoms & pills

Contraception

Click on the questions to discover the answers!

  1. In the UK, some types of contraception incur a prescription charge?

    False. All contraceptives are free if obtained via a doctor or nurse. However, emergency contraception may also be purchased for approximately £25 by women over 16 years old via a pharmacist who has undergone specific training and who works to specific guidelines (a Patient Group Directive). Condoms may be purchased at various outlets


  2. After seeing a person under 16 years of age, doctors and nurses have a duty to tell parents and carers what happened, and let them look at the records

    False. However, under the Fraser Guidelines, doctors and nurses should encourage the teenager to talk with a parent or carer

  3. An internal examination is usually necessary before the contraceptive pill can be prescribed for the first time

    False. The doctor or nurse will ask questions about personal and family history, and measure blood pressure and weight

  4. After having unprotected sex a woman has 48 hours - 2 days - to get emergency contraception (the morning after pill)

    False. Emergency contraception is licensed for use for 72 hours after unprotected sex, and will have some effect beyond this time. An IUD (coil) may be fitted up to 5 days after unprotected sex, or up to 5 days after earliest possible ovulation

  5. A woman can get pregnant if she has sex during her period

    True. Especially if she has a short menstrual cycle (the start of one period to the start of the next) or ovulates early in that cycle

  6. A woman has to wait at least 2 weeks after sex for a pregnancy test to give a reliable result

    True. She needs to wait 3 weeks after sex to be sure of a negative result

  7. The injectable contraceptive Depo-Provera can be dangerous if it stops the periods

    False. Depo-Provera frequently stops the periods, which many women appreciate, and which is not dangerous 


  8. It's OK to use KY jelly with condoms to aid lubrication

    True. Oil-based lubricants may cause rubber (latex) to perish so should not be used with condoms, but there is no concern with water-based lubricants such as KY jelly 

  9. The most dangerous contraceptive pills for a woman to miss are the ones in the middle of the packet

    False. The ones at the beginning and end of the pack are the worst to miss, as that effectively lengthens the pill-free week beyond 7 days (the time that ovulation is not being suppressed) and could therefore lead to ovulation